Are vaccines needed for kittens?

Asked By: Micaela Casper
Date created: Sun, Apr 25, 2021 8:31 PM
Best answers
Answered By: Devan Gleichner
Date created: Tue, Apr 27, 2021 10:30 PM

Vaccines are needed for kittens. At about 6-8 weeks, kittens should receive 3 vaccines. Then, at 12 weeks they receive their boosters and their rabies vaccine.

Answered By: Colleen Greenfelder
Date created: Wed, Apr 28, 2021 12:42 PM
All kittens need certain core vaccines, which provide immunity against the most dangerous and ...
Answered By: Silas Klein
Date created: Fri, Apr 30, 2021 4:11 AM
Vaccinations are important for your young kitten. Some infectious diseases are fatal, and vaccinations can protect your kitten from many of these diseases. In order to be effective, immunizations must be given as a series of injections at prescribed intervals, so it is essential that you are on time for your kitten’s scheduled vaccinations.
Answered By: Rubye Gerlach
Date created: Fri, Apr 30, 2021 10:06 AM
To help protect kittens they'll need two sets of vaccinations to get them started. Kittens should have their first set of vaccinations at nine weeks old and at three months old they should receive the second set to boost their immune system. After this, kittens and cats usually need 'booster' vaccinations every twelve months.
Answered By: Chris Marks
Date created: Sat, May 1, 2021 12:41 PM
I recommend starting vaccinations at about 8 weeks of age, continuing until the kitten is 4 months old. According to the American Association of Feline Practitioners (AAFP), the core vaccines (those that are recommended for ALL cats) are feline panleukopenia virus (FPV), feline herpesvirus-1 (FHV-1), and feline calicivirus (FCV) as well as Rabies.
Answered By: Jaclyn Hane
Date created: Sun, May 2, 2021 12:12 PM
According to the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ASPCA), kittens take in disease-fighting antibodies from the mother cat's milk when they nurse. Most kittens are weaned by around 8 weeks and receive their first vaccinations around the age of 6 to 8 weeks.
Answered By: Korbin Braun
Date created: Mon, May 3, 2021 6:56 PM
Kittens are vaccinated once every three to four weeks until they reach 16 weeks of age or older. However, to avoid over-vaccination, most veterinarians will recommend starting the vaccine at 8 weeks of age, followed by boosters at 12 weeks and 16 weeks old. Rabies is the other core kitten vaccination.
Answered By: Dallas Christiansen
Date created: Wed, May 5, 2021 10:11 AM
First-year kitten vaccinations When kittens are nursing, antibodies in their mother’s milk help protect them from infections. But after about six weeks old and eating solid food, it’s time for them to be vaccinated. Kitties need several immunizations during their first year to protect them against serious diseases.
Answered By: Giles Schroeder
Date created: Thu, May 6, 2021 3:18 AM
Kittens should start getting vaccinations when they are 6 to 8 weeks old until they are about 16 weeks old. Then they must be boostered a year later.. The shots come in a series every 3 to 4 weeks....
Answered By: Hobart Kshlerin
Date created: Thu, May 6, 2021 5:32 PM
Kittens receive a series of vaccines over a 12 to 16-week period beginning at between 6 and 8 weeks of age. Earlier vaccinations are not effective because kittens ingest beneficial protective antibodies in their mother’s milk during the first few hours after birth, but these antibodies also interfere with their responses to vaccines.
Answered By: Sierra Murray
Date created: Sat, May 8, 2021 2:41 PM
The four core vaccines for cats are: Rabies FVRCP: Feline Rhinotracheitis Virus/Herpesvirus 1 (FVR/FHV-1) Feline Calicivirus (FCV) Feline Panleukopenia (FPV) Feline Rhinotracheitis Virus/Herpesvirus 1 (FVR/FHV-1) Feline Calicivirus (FCV) Feline Panleukopenia (FPV)
FAQ
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Are covid-19 vaccines safe?

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The Pfizer and Moderna vaccines authorized by the FDA have very good safety records. The FDA granted emergency use authorization (EUA) because research data from large clinical trials has shown them to be safe and effective. All three types of vaccines are safe and effective in preventing serious cases of COVID-19.

Are covid-19 vaccines safe?

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Can i mix and match covid-19 vaccines?

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Health experts generally agree that the mixing and matching of the vaccines should be safe. But clinical trials are ongoing. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention maintains that the safety...

http://ascoronavirus.com/can-i-mix-and-match-covid-19-vaccines

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Are there any coronavirus vaccines?

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As of February 27, 2021, large-scale (Phase 3) clinical trials are in progress or being planned for two COVID-19 vaccines in the United States: AstraZeneca COVID-19 vaccine; Novavax COVID-19 vaccine

Are there any coronavirus vaccines?

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