Welcome
Login

Covid-19 Times - Detroit Driving - Indian Village - North Side View of Iroquois Street

Featured

Thanks! Share it with your friends!

URL

You disliked this video. Thanks for the feedback!

Sorry, only registred users can create playlists.
URL


Added by COVID in Coronavirus in North America
36 Views

Coronavirus: Description video

Watch the video “Covid-19 Times - Detroit Driving - Indian Village - North Side View of Iroquois Street” and like it!

Indian Village is a historic, affluent neighborhood located on Detroit's east side, bound to the north and south by Mack Avenue and East Jefferson Avenue, respectively, along the streets of Burns, Iroquois, and Seminole. The district was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1972.

The district has a number of architecturally-significant homes built in the early 20th century. A number of the houses have been substantially restored, and many others well kept up. Bordering Indian Village to the west is West Village, with additional historic homes, townhouses and apartments.

Many of the homes were built by prominent architects, such as Albert Kahn, Louis Kamper and William Stratton, for some of the area's most prominent citizens, such as Edsel Ford. A lot of homes are very large, with some over 12,000 square feet (1,100 m²). Many have a carriage house, with some of those being larger than an average suburban home. Some of the houses also have large amounts of Pewabic Pottery tiles.

Indian Village has very active community organizations, including the Indian Village Association, Men's Garden Club & Women's Garden Club. The neighborhood hosts an annual Home & Garden Tour the first Saturday of June, a neighborhood yard sales in September, a holiday home tour in December, and many other community events. The neighborhood contains many historic homes including that of automotive entrepreneur Henry Leland, founder of Lincoln and Cadillac, who resided at 1052 Seminole St.

The Iroquois or Haudenosaunee "People of the Longhouse") are a historically powerful northeast Native American confederacy in North America. They were known during the colonial years to the French as the Iroquois League, and later as the Iroquois Confederacy, and to the English as the Five Nations, comprising the Mohawk, Onondaga, Oneida, Cayuga, and Seneca. After 1722, they accepted the Tuscarora people from the Southeast into their confederacy, as they were also Iroquoian-speaking, and became known as the Six Nations.

The Iroquois have absorbed many other individuals from various peoples into their tribes as a result of warfare, adoption of captives, and by offering shelter to displaced peoples. Culturally, all are considered members of the clans and tribes into which they are adopted by families.

The historic St. Lawrence Iroquoians, Wyandot (Huron), Erie, and Susquehannock, all independent peoples, also spoke Iroquoian languages. In the larger sense of linguistic families, they are often considered Iroquoian peoples because of their similar languages and cultures, all descended from the Proto-Iroquoian people and language; politically, however, they were traditional enemies of the Iroquois League.[2] In addition, Cherokee is an Iroquoian language: the Cherokee people are believed to have migrated south from the Great Lakes in ancient times, settling in the backcountry of the Southeast United States, including what is now Tennessee.

In 2010, more than 45,000 enrolled Six Nations people lived in Canada, and about 80,000 in the United States.

Liked the “Covid-19 Times - Detroit Driving - Indian Village - North Side View of Iroquois Street” video?

Share it with your friends!

Post your comment

Comments

Be the first to comment
RSS